Apple Park and Higher Education Future

In this post Joshua Kim tries to find lessons higher education can draw from Apple’s just opened 175-acre Apple Park campus, which cost $5 billion to build. Dream big and build campuses that force people to collaborate was all I got out of this article.


Harvard Dean Says High Ed should take a more Positive Approach to Micro-Credentialing

Hunt Lambert, who is the Dean of Continuing Education at Harvard, says colleges should take a more positive approach to micro-credentialing and access methods it has resisted for generations. I think he is probably right.


David Gelenter’s Vision for Higher Education

Yale computer scientist David Gelenter says that over 90% of U S colleges will be closed in the next generation and will be replaced by alternative credentials offered by museums, libraries, tech companies, etc. I believe that alternative credentialing through organizations such as, where I have completed over 100 courses, will continue to gain popularity, but I also believe that traditional educational institutions will be around for many generations.


What is OTT?

I learned a new educational acronym today, OTT, for Over the Top Technologies. OTT are technologies that aid in the delivery of audio, video, and media content via the Internet, without without requiring users to subscribe to, or pay for a service such as Comcast or DirecTV. It can be delivered to every device that can be connected to the Internet. Some examples of OTT interfaces are Facebook, YouTube, and Amazon Video. Some examples of online learning via OTT are TEDEd and edX. There are three ways OTT will be critical to education in the near future:

1. AS budgets for educational providers continue to shrink, OTT will lower costs.
2. Online and blended learning are big investors in OTT.
3. OTT can support OER (open educational resources).

New NMC Report: Scaling Solutions to HigerEd’s Biggest Challenges

You can download this report from the New Media Consortium at this link:


Joshua Kim on Digital Learning Innovation

Professor Joshua Kim asks several provocative questions in this article. I won’t try to summarize his main points because he expressed them much better than I could in a brief summary.

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