The Education Internet is NOT Broken

In this article Joshua Kim says that although we constantly hear that the Internet is broken, the education Internet is NOT broken. About  three million students take all their classes online, and an additional three million take at least one online class.


UMUC to Spin IT off into For-Profit Company

The University of Maryland University College (UMUC) has announced that it is going to spin off its IT department into a separate for-profit department called AccelerEd. Joshua Kim does not think this is a good idea, but I think it probably is the wave of the future. UMUC is the university’s online division.

Telepresence Technologies Personalize Online Learning

Virtual collaboration tools such as conferencing tools and robotic proxies make it possible for students to have meaningful, real-time interactions with each other and instructors.

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Dr. Joshua Kim’s 6 Rules for Online Learning

I will just list them and not discuss them:

1. Don’t rely on online learning programs to make lots of money.
2. Don’t follow the market.
3. Don’t try to go to scale.
4. Don’t separate online learning from residential learning.
5 Do treat online learning as a disciplined experiment.
6. Do prioritize economic sustainability – not growth.

6 eLearning Products from Educause 2016

They are:

1. Efficient IP helping campuses boost DNS security
2. Cengage’s learning objects fully prepared for competency-based education
3. Citirx’s classroom virtualization software
4. Bomgar’s two-point verification software
5. D2L’s Autumn16 release – Desire to Learn is a LMS
6. Blackboard is trying to improve the accessibility of its LMS.

LinkedIn’s New Learning Portal

The network for working professionals, LinkedIn, has announced its new learning portal, LinkedIn Learning. The social network acquired, which has over 9,000 coursese online, for $1.5 billion a year and a half ago. Microsoft is in the process of acquiring LInkedIn for $26.2 billion. Personal disclosure – I nave competed dozens of courses at


MOOC-Based Micro Master’s Degrees

MIT and 13 other universities are launching “micro-master’s degrees. Students would complete up to one half the courses required for a master’s degree, taught via a MOOC, earn a credential, and then, decide if they wanted to complete the master’s program. MIT is charging $150 for each of its MOOC courses. Initially MIT is offering a master’s degree in supply chain management, which is endorsed by Walmart.